"In the tradition of Will Hobbs (Down the Yukon) and Gary Paulsen (Hatchet), Mitch Martin has crafted a survival story set in an Arkansas wilderness of the 1830s. The idea of living in a tree appeals to the adventurous soul in every kid! A good read!" --Carolyn Witt, Washington, Missouri, Retired Director of the Washington Public Library

"The Boy Who Lived In A Tree is an historic fiction that can be used in the classroom as a literature set or read aloud selection. The rich vocabulary and adventure of David appeals to students and causes them to connect with the character and visualize all he is experiencing. The detailed description of the Ozarks and the suspense keep the students questioning and predicting as they read. It is an excellent source for teaching reading strategies and an enjoyable read." --Wynn Scheer, Washington, Missouri, Elementary Teacher

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How is it that a small-town farm boy grew up to become an author?

Mitch, having already become a successful businessman, decided to stretch his talents even further and become a writer. Somewhat based on Mitch's experiences as he grew up, The Boy Who Lived In A Tree describes how a young boy grew up and survived in the wilderness during the 1830s. Mitch's unique experiences gave him plenty of material to write a story that blends fiction with the everyday hardships of survival that faced early settlers in the Buffalo National River region. These hardy settlers developed skills to survive, and Mitch captures these skills and teaches them to us in his book. We may never need these skills; however, Mitch, with his narrative teaching style, makes certain that these skills will not be forgotten.

In 2011, Mitch's book was selected to be republished. Having thus been honored, Mitch was interviewed January 10, 2012, on "The Book Club with John Austin," a nationally-syndicated radio show.

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Last updated: 01/26/17